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What we can learn from Islam: Reflections and activities

Michele Frankeni  |  07 November 2018

Read Christianity tells stories; Islam finds designs in Eureka Street and take part in the following reflections and activities.

Questions

  • Why is zero important?
  • The Roman numeral of 1388 is 12 characters long. What is it?
  • You have to remove your shoes before entering a mosque. Can you think of any other places there is a dress code?
  • What is the explanation one of the imam’s give for the word ‘jihad’?
  • Why wouldn’t Michael McGirr want Christianity judged by the actions of the Ku Klux Klan?
  • Why does Michael believe memory is important?

Activities

  • Investigate what other inventions we use today that originated in Muslim countries. Pick one and write a short story about what life would be like if we didn’t have it. (Hint: What would your life be like without coffee?)
  • Commit to memory a passage from St Mark’s Gospel. Recite it to the class, but also provide a short reflection on why you chose the particular passage and what it means to you.
  • Start a family 'memory bank'. Go home and interview one of your parents or grandparents about an important event in their lives. Get them to share the story as they remember it, and write it down. Now write a short reflection about what you can learn from their experience – something can be passed on to future generations. Place the story somewhere everyone in the family has access to it and encourage other members to add stories to the family 'memory bank'. 

For younger students

Michael McGirr speaks about the importance of memory. As a class discuss one of Jesus’ parables and then make a memory board. Pin up pictures or items that remind you of the story you’ve chosen. Be prepared to talk about why you chose that particular item. How do we know what Jesus said to his disciples? How did the stories get passed down to us?

There are a couple of games you can play to boost your memory.

Memory (with playing cards)

Divide into small groups, each with a deck of playing cards. Spread the cards out face down. The first person turns up two cards – if they’re a pair (same number) then take those two cards and have another turn. If the cards don’t match, turn them face down again and the next person tries to match two cards. The winner is the one who has matched the most cards.

Kim’s game

Organise a tray of about 20 small items. Make sure everyone can see the tray for about a minute and then cover it/take it away. Write down as many items as you can remember.

How difficult did you find these games? Brainstorm some of the methods people use to remember things that have happened (e.g. writing them down, sharing stories, taking pictures). How difficult would it be for people to remember all the things that happen to them if they didn't have ways to help them remember?  

 

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