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Sneaky Jesus Song: You found me

Brendan Nicholls |  13 September 2017

In Australia, The Fray's 'You found me' reached #1 on the ARIA charts and went double platinum. 

The song identifies the human response to adversity and the sense of loss and hopelessness we sometimes feel. And it raises questions that many of us experience in our journey through life. 

Issac Slade, lead singer & piano, explained the lyrics as a response to his interaction with fans and his personal life:

‘I kept getting these phone calls from home - tragedy after tragedy... If there is some kind of Person in charge of this planet - are they sleeping? Smoking? Where are they? I just imagined running into God standing on a street corner like Bruce Springsteen, smoking a cigarette, and I'd have it out with Him.’

Consider the thoughts this song invokes:

Where were You? Where is He?

Who is God? Where do we expect him? He often turns up unexpected? Are we ready for Him as presented to us?

He is the only one who knows and does not hide from us. We move away from him or fail to see Him in our midst.

Remember that:

He will always find, even if you are not looking for Him. He is never too late. He waits for you. He will find you, wherever you are. He was there. He never waits, He runs to you whenever you call; even when you do not call.

The song reminds us of the ‘lost things’ parables in the Gospel of Luke 15:1-32. The greatest joy is in finding and being found. The pain comes the knowing we are lost and not close to Him; not the absence of God. He is never absent.

We pray for all artists who help us find God in the wonder of their art. We pray especially for the members of The Fray, who we pray find peace in their lives and joy in the gift that they offer to others. We also pray that we may be inspired to look closely for God as we move through our day. When we find you, Lord, may we proclaim Your goodness and rejoice in your presence, as we offer this joy to others. 

Artist: The Fray (formed. 2002 – still going strong)

Song: You Found Me (released – November 2008)

 

 

Brendan Nicholls is the liturgy coordinator at St Ignatius College, Geelong. 

 

Topic tags: ourrelationshipwithgod, people’sstoriesoffaith, faithinthemedia

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